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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98 (some duplicates have been removed)
of course. so trying to -- china is a much interest in canadian energy and natural resources. we are very much interested in building trust, strategic trust and cooperation with china. and from enable perspective, of course, i'll give you one sort of anecdote. you were referring to this the islands, two months ago i attended the western pacific naval symposium hosted -- and have the opportunity to sit between the deputy commander of the people's liberation army navy, and the commander of the ambassadors japanese maritime self-defense force, a euphemism for the japanese navy. it was at a time when the island was leading on cnn and bbc. i thought as i was sitting between two them there's an opportunity for a canadian to do something extraordinary from an naval diplomatic perspective and put this thing to bed. [laughter] >> how did that go? >> not too well, not too well. [laughter] which is my point. i spoke with the chinese admirals interpreter. i spoke with admiral commander in english, a great conversation. but never was the bridge build or even considered. and i think one of the key issu
to china beginning a string of meetings that would eventually open that isolated eastern nation to the western world. that opening checked soviet expansionism and in a sense was the beginning of the end of the cold war. >> this was the week that changed the world. >> it was also the beginning of china's entry into the world economy, which has resulted in that country becoming the world's second largest economy. >> red china's battle plan. >> but back then the idea of a rapprochement with china would have been rejected as pure fantasy. china was a communist regime that had been fighting america and its allies across the globe. how did the decision come about in the midst of such intense opposition? what were the internal maneuverings that paved the way, the secret dealings that made it actually happen? who better to ask than the man himself, dr. henry kissinger. this is what the world looked like when you enter into the white house with richard nixon. the united states has had no relations with china. we have been implacably opposed to this regime. we fought against them, america
will look at the new communist party of leadership in china and that impact on u.s.- china relations. hosted by the center for strategic and international studies in washington, this is an hour. i'd also like to recognize former ambassador to china jim sasser who's sitting right there, one of my close friends. thank you for coming, senator. glad to see you. well, the panel is a really good one, kurt campbell, assistant secretary of state for east asia and pacific affairs. he became -- came to that job in 2009, previously the ceo and co- founder of the center for a new american security. he was a professor at harvard, associate professor of public policy and international relations at the kennedy school. chris johnson, senior adviser and freeman chair in china studies here at csis. his most important public service, as far as i'm concerned, is he gave me a lot of help in preparing for the presidential debate. and i'll be -- always be grateful for that, chris. he's frequently advised senior white house, cabinet, congressional, military and foreign officials on chinese leadership and on beijing
hard currency on the open market. >> and though the soviet empire is a thing of the past, china is echoing the aspirations of its predecessor. >> there's no question that we're going to face a very serious challenge in the years to come, dealing with a rising china that wants to be dominant and hegemonic in its own region, wants to control sea lines of communication, wants to control the south china sea. and we have allies who stand to lose from that and look to us for support. i think that's the likeliest area of actual conflict. >> the pentagon will often say and right now the u.s. spends something like 4, 5, 6 times what china spends on its defense spending. and the big question then becomes what is china's intention? (instrumental music) >> in a national call to arms defense secretary leon panetta warned the threat of a significant cyber attack against america is already here. >> the collective result of these kinds of attacks could be a cyber pearl harbor. >> what are the threats american's face in this century? with the attacks of september 11th, the u.s. has had to comple
with china. unrest has continued, despite ongoing peace talks with separatist rebels. blocker is -- bloggers in china will no longer be able to comment anonymously. post maybe easily deleted, and information may be sent to authorities. more from hong kong. >> 500 million and growing. the sheer number of internet users and the kind of information they share has long been a source of anxiety for chinese authorities. new measures mean bloggers will have to provide their real names. service providers are required to take down any posts that break the law, and report them to the authorities. the internet has been responsible for uncovering scandals involving corrupt local officials. the government said it wants to encourage more of this, but it seems only up to a point. >> activities on the internet that have seriously infringed on legal rights of the general public have threatened a state, leading to demands from various parts of society to strengthen regulation of the internet. >> chinese internet users have been the first to criticize the new rules. >> since the internet came into china, the g
history tv on c-span3. >> china's emerging global power and maritime strategy were the focus of a panel discussion at the halifax international security forum. panelists discuss the territorial disputes involving japan in the east china sea, cybersecurity and international diplomacy. this is an hour, ten minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. this session for miscalculation, china and the rise of confusion or confucianism. i'd like to hand over to steve clemens who's moderating this session. .. >> thank you all for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me, and i went online to find a chinese event that is being held right now looking at u.s. grand strategy, canada, japan and india. there are no canadian, japanese americans or canadians on china's panel. don't have any chinese with us today but we should have a lot of fun discussing that our national strategies but involving in the asian pacific region and with china but i want to acknowledge that that voice wasn't with us today. that might give us more room to run. because we do
india and china to develop into a completely distinct world civilizations without having much to do with each other for long-term history. let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly simple geographic place with all of these natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that l
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
allegedly hitting four members of a family from china then taking off leaving the scene of the accident. one of the victims died later at the hospital. >> gina and the entire eunice family is destroyed by what happened and i think it's fair to say that their main concern is for the yao family. >> bail is set at $2 million. she will be back in court on monday. her lawyer says she was about to graduate from college with hopes of becoming a police officer. >>> the holiday vacation is over early for members of the united states senate and for president obama. he took the red eye from hawaii to washington overnight. senators will be busy working on a plan to avoid the "fiscal cliff" today. but house gop leaders say they will not return to washington unless the senate passes a bill. with no deal on the horizon, a new poll finds the gop gets the biggest share of the blame for the stalemate. >> both sides here have a problem with the american people and it's why congress has 11% job approval rating. >> even starbucks is getting itchy for an agreement. its employees are writing "come together" on cof
from china and injured two others. police say the impact knocked the three pedestrians about 30 feet down a hillside. while the victim's family did not appear in court, the suspect's relatives came to the hearing. they declined to talk on camera. but the suspect's attorney did speak, saying gina eunice is praying for the victims, the yao family. >> the entire eunice family is destroyed by what happened, and i think it's fair to say that their main concern is for the yao family. >> reporter: district attorney george gascon says he will prosecute this case agressively. he says this is another example why people should not drink and drive. >> we are very concerned about the use of alcohol and driving and especially during the holiday season when there's so many people attending parties. >> reporter: eunice did not enter a plea on wednesday. a judge set the bail amount at $2 million, citing public safety for the high amount. if she's able to make that bail, the judge says she will not be able to drink or drive. eunice is scheduled to return to court on monday. in san francisco, cbs 5. >
that doesn't pose any threats now and really won't, can't for many years. they see china as a potential threat in the future but recognize we have common interests in china which would ease that threat. and they see the great instability in the middle east as posing specific threats to us such as the chemical weapons in syria which could fall in the hands of terrorists, but see these threats as threats to be managed, not to be resolved once and for all. meaning we can protect the chemical weapons. we don't have to go in and turn syria into a democracy. >> you want the united states to build one of the points that the report makes early on, to build on comparative strengths and address comparative weaknesses. from your standpoint what are those strengths that need to be built on, and then what are the weaknesses that need to be addressed? >> well, our military forces have unprecedented capabilities. we've spent a lot over the last 10 years, as you know, and it shows in our naval power, our air power, our space capabilities, our intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance capabilities. our
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
other] >> we don't live in china. >> we have this conversation. neil: the bottom line is that it will be part of this wave. what do you fear? you say if it doesn't happen -- >> i think unions are dead and gone. >> let's hope they're not done. >> when we get people that are more nonunion, they have to go. neil: were your thoughts on this? [laughter] [talking over each other] [talking over each other] >> units are not. make your point. >> i believe that workers have the right to organize and i also believe employers have the right to hire nonunion workers. i think that is how most americans feel. they should have the choice to be in a union. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] >> why are they not taking that choice? neil: .99% union? remark. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] >> allall right, i wish i had me time. neil: when we come back, think patriot act. find out why the government may already be invading your pipers. they may someday lock you up for a crime that you weren't even thinking of committing. this is like a lawsuit that rick
into a group of people last week. the accident killed a 56-year- old woman visiting from china and injured two others. police say the injury knocked the three pedestrians about 30 feet down a hillside. while the victims' family did not appear in court, the suspects' relatives came to the hearing. they declined to talk on camera. but the suspect's attorney did speak saying gina eunice is praying for the victims, the yao family. >> gina and the eunice family are destroyed by what happened. and i think it's fair to say that their main concern is for the yao family. >> reporter: district attorney george gascon says he will prosecute this case aggressively. he says this is another example why people should not drink and drive. >> we are very concerned about the use of alcohol and driving and especially during the holiday season where so many people are attending parties. >> reporter: if eunice is able to make it $2 million bail, the judge says she would not be able to drink or drive. she is scheduled to return to court monday. >> da, did anything come up in court about whether she had any prior con
is to be pushed off and if you do you push it puts a to china who doesn't care. yeah it's much worse. at the bottom line is america is actually good about mining in terms of world standards we have the highest standards really of safety the you are talking about huge amounts of toxic metals that they admittedly don't know how to control. it is in the they don't want to be and i do not think they are evil by nature they just don't know how to do at. in arizona may be one person dies a year. that's ridiculous. that's nothing. more people die at barnes and noble or something. so, i'm not worried about like to see factor. in other countries it is much higher. they don't have the standards and basic the mining companies are like any corporation. whatever the rules are in that country they are going to go to the lowest common denominator if they can get away with it the well. the company that owns the mine in my town is a huge offender around the world. they play nice here they are not very nice around the world. which is what i think that you were asking. i talked to my executives that ba
nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a new way for china's communist leaders to censor their critics. >> ( translated ): since the internet came into china, the chinese government has been repeatedly imposing restrictive measures, such as shielding, blocking and banning. it has even spent billions of dollars to build a firewall against overseas sites. they just don't want to see any freedom of speech which is provided by the constitution because it will hurt their vested interest. >> holman: the new curbs come in the wake of a series of online discussions that have helped expose corruption scandals. russian president vladimir putin signed a bill into law today banning americans from adopting russian children. the move terminated more than 50 adopt
. >>> more american jobs than ever >>> more american jobs than ever depend on investments from china. we'll go to california where the chinese are finding bargains they can't pass up on "cbs this morning." "this is george. he is a good little monkey and always very curious. one day george got an important letter. he's built a rocket ship to travel into space." google, how far is earth to the moon? the moon is 238,900 miles... "the great moment had come." 3, 2, 1... [ giggling ] yo, give it up, dude! up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ ♪ at quicken loans our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app allows you to quickly calculate your mortgage payment based on today's incredibly low interest rates... right from your iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea why dawn was gone for so long... ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only
than 2 million in iphone 5s in china just over the last three days. that's the best ever debut for the iphone line in china. apple is china's second biggest market, although it did lose a lot of market share while they were waiting for that i5 to come out. and citi research has downgraded apple from a hold to a buy. you can see there just below $500. >>> also, the national association for business economics growth in 2013 to come in at 2.1% after growing by 2.2% in 2012. that would continue the same tepid growth that the country has seen since the recession ended back in mid 2009. >>> and the nation is mourning the horrific event of friday in newtown, connecticut. president obama spoke last night about change. >> we can't kol rate this any more. these tragedies must end. and to end them, we must change. we will be told that the causes of such violence are complex, and that is true. no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil from the world or event every senseless act of violence in our society. >>> and earlier in the day, new york city mayor michael bloomberg called on th
lived in china. once again, america's proof we are falling behind in infrastructure. thanks for watching "street signs." i'll send it to "closing bell." >> and hello again, everybody. welcome to the "closing bell." i'm mandy drury sitting in for maria bartiromo. happy boxing day as well. >> christmas is over but mandy has been celebrating boxing day all day. we didn't get any presents from lawmakers in washington yet. we're still five days away from falling off the proverbial fiscal cliff and wall street, like everybody else, is waiting for some kind of a solution here, and as you can see by today's numbers the waiting game continues, although we thank brian sullivan and you, mandy, for bringing us back to positive territory in the last hour. >> i'm not sure we can take credit but we'll take it. >> the dow is up a fraction at the moment. 13,139 after a meandering much of the day. the nasdaq hardest hit today. technology has been very volatile recently. still down a fraction right now. 13 points, fraction percentage-wise and the s&p is down 3.33 at 1423. five days left until the fiscal cl
years, there has been a lot more further people's republic of china and the string of pearls strategy into the indian ocean. pakistan is some most important city you have never heard of because the chinese got a post there to listen to ships going in and out of the straight of hormuz and they also have resource relationships with iran and sudan. and as i think you all know, records of those countries and how they tend to make war on their neighbors and also we have the china daily newspaper. its total propagandpropagand a for the peoples of china and i'm wondering, i think the chinese sold the ideas of -- which you might've studied at the naval academy but i'm wondering, in the next few years, with their lower number of ships and sequestration threat over us and the current expansion of chinese power, how would you best manage our military resources around the world? [laughter] >> thank you for the softball question. [laughter] admiral mullen when he was at her graduation as chief of naval operations come he told us to speak truth to power. as a junior officer, not to follow unethical
with a bunch of allies who supported him. >> i've been reading kissinger's book on china, but he raises's broader question which is important. unfathomable as it is to americans there are parts of the world where they do not believe in alienable rights, right? they don't believe in human rights in the way that we do. >> exactly. and when we try to impose it on them they consider it a violation of their sovereignty. >> exactly. >> china feels that way often. russia, same thing. how far do we go in promoting human rights? the trade off that we'll get here. the law gets passed and human rights violators in russia can't come year and now 1,000 children don't come to the united states and people who want them don't get them. >> my personal view, no. they're glad to take our money and they've long had to put their money overseas, but they do not want human rights promotion and we've seen that inside russia and we've seen that against the crockdown on the internet and this is just the latest interaction of the series of things going back for more than a year against the political opposition an
approach to this, and governor romney's statement labeling china a currency manipulator on day 1 suggests taking a tougher alignment with china may be an issue, is worth pursuing. we will see not an enormous change but probably a check up in preparation and confrontation, oversight. >> anyone else? >> i suspect on detention policy we won't see a lot of change. we did not see a lot of change from the bush and administration to the obama administration, the obama administration argued that the protection should not extend to the circuits, congress wanted to keep the courts out more than they have when they passed the military detention acts and everything else in 2006 and tried to correct for what they saw as the court trying to extend jurisdiction, they have established a line, i do not see they can't push back against that line and the battle lines that performed at this point. >> i basically agree with greg the obama administration continued, without any change whatsoever. and on the ground, on the question, with new detainee's, the legacy cases are not going anywhere. governor romney wo
. >>> china government is cracking down on the internet with a new law requiring users to register their names. until recently, web posters could post anonymous comments online. it comes after the leaders were upset by a flood by online complaints about the official abuses. >>> russia proposed talks with the main syrian opposition coalition even though it had previously bashed western countries for recognizing the group. that as syrian rebels step up the seize on military base and elsewhere. leland vittert has the latest. >> momentum in syria on the rebel's side they gladly rejected off by slaw to meet and discuss a peace plan saying they will discuss putting down the weapons when bashar assad leaves power. are you are russia long supported assad with weapons and host to russia only foreign naval base in the syrian city of tarqtus. with assad's army playing defense, the russian peace plan appears to be an attempt to hedge their bet on assad making the inroads with the rebels. that will be hard. as rebel video uploaded to youtube show unexploded russian made bombs littering the syrian cities. t
. that is something surprising at this point. >> in china they have no ideology. 75 members of the communist national people's congress are billionaires now. >> i also learned that you like me do nothing on new year's eve. >> not nothing, you just don't do it with strangers. >> i'm happy to make it. absolutely. but here's something for you. you are watching "morning joe." here's what happens. right now it's time for that. take it away. >> aloha, hawaii. the president is on his way back to d.c. where for him it's about playing small ball with most members of congress still in their home district, speaker boehner put that ball in the senate's court. harry reid tossed it right back. are we looking at another lost day in the negotiations? hitching a right on air force one, the new senator from hawaii and it's not what we expected it to be. here we go again. the president in washington and another deadline. secretary geithner warns we will hit the debt ceiling even before we tumble over the fiscal cliff. good morning from washington. it is thursday, december 27th. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke rus
. if you look at the facts, 32% of our manufacturing base has been gutted and sold to china, india, any foreign country that has cheap labor. the top patriotic american companies are parking their profits and offshore accounts so they do not have to pay a fair share of their taxes. the bottom line is since the late '70s, the wealthiest 2% in this country are making 25 times their wealth that they made a black -- back then. there are only paying 40% more in taxes. this country is doomed if we do not start putting terrace of the imports coming into this country. the republican party is selling you an outright lie. thank you. host: let's show you a facebook posting. the economist and professor at the university of maryland will be with us and about 25 minutes or so. he will take your calls and give you his economic outlook for 2013. he has written a lot on the matter. from west virginia, independent. caller: is, sir. i would just like to say that i am not very optimistic above the future of the united states right now. we are in so much that it is pathetic. our budget is way over. this pre
? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting better each time out launching missiles and setting off nuclear explosions. >> on that note, how realistic do you think it is? and how soon do you think it would be that they would be able to i'm one of these long-range missiles with a nuclear warhead? >> that is the real question. this last missile test was real important because it showed that they were successful. they got it up into the atmosphere. it can go a long way to the united states. now, if they perfect nuclear explosions and start miniaturizing it, being able to put it on a
conference during a crisis with red china, and his aides were warning him to be careful about what he said. don't worry, i'll just confuse them. he did. ike often have bad syntax. i noticed in his private letters and memos were clear as a bell. ike was smiling, congenial but also tough. as vice president richard nixon once wrote that he was a more complex and devious man than people realized. quote i'm and devious in the vastness of the word, added nixon. i was talking to eisenhower's son, john, his dad, about the apparent balance between the sunny congenial ike and the cold-bloocold-bloo ded ike. john smiled for a moment and said make that a 75% cold-blooded. when ike was elected president, military, the top brass were hopeful that the former general could be counted on to spend more on weapons and the military. in fact, ike reduce military spending. he was always wary of the military heightening and the needs for weapon and mean. when he saw the pentagon estimate that the red army could overrun europe in two weeks, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take thi
to go into a press conference in a crisis with red china, and aids warned him to be careful. don't worry, said, ike, i'll confuse them, and he did. he had bad syntax, but i noticed in the private letters and memos were clear as a bell. he was smiling congenial, but also tough. his vice president, richard nixon wrote that ike was, quote, a deviant man, devious in the best sense of the word, added nixon. i was talking to eisenhower's son, john, he said, about the apparent even balance about the congenial ike and cold-blooded ike. he said, make that 75% cold-blooded. when ike was elected president, the military, top brass, hopeful the formal general would spend more on weapons and the military: in fact, ike reduced military spending. he was always weary of the military hyping the needs for weapons and men. when he saw the pentagon's estimate, he wrote in the margin, i doubt it, it took us three months just to take sicily. when the spending requests came in, he said, i know the boys at the pentagon. he believed real national security was from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk, boy, we c
an originator of new kinds of policies. if you take, for example, china policy i think that he may be reluctant to react to a china which is very different from the way it was in the past. >> brown: let me bring david ignatius back. i guess it depends on what you think is needed right now, right? >> i think the world's a mess as kerry believes. he's right. and needs a strong american voice. needs the sort of steady hand that some of these experiences can bring. i point i would make about kerry is that although he often comes across as a stiff, as an establishment figure very form layic, in terms of shall ideas an willness-- willingness to engage adversaries, reach out and try to find a channel to iran, for example, reach out to the palestinians, try to think of new ways to deal with the arab world, kerry is on the more innovative side. so i think he is not going to be a wild radical-- the country will miss having someone like susan rice who is a younger, different voice. but i think that kerry-- it's wrong to think of kerry of just being a throwback to 30 years ago. >> brown: is it clear still
with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered but the nightmare begins. so it's heartbreaking. >> did you want to comment? >> we see it as a lost opportunity. there's a lot of lost opportunities in the 20th 20th century, in march 5, 1965, when stall yip dies, the stove yet leaders reach out the united states and talk about endin
that maybe this new regime in china is going to be spending more helping to prop up the property department there, housing, than might mean more demand for industrial metals. copper today, the standout in part because of that. also, a different note, the s.e.c. ahead of the holiday delayed a decision on the proposed etf, according to the "wall street journal," the etf would hold twice as much copper in terms of holdings compared to the jpmorgan holding approved on december 14th. >> i think 182,000 physical tons they could take off the market. we'll revisit it later. for a moment, thank you. bob pisani is joining me on the floor of the nyse. the big discussion is about retail and what the figures from mastercard tell us. >> i just want to point out that the dow industrials dropped in the middle of the day. there had been some concern the house leadership which is all coming back now did not send out a 48-hour notice to their membership requiring all the members to show up and vote, even though there's no fiscal cliff deal, there was hope they would bring everybody back and try to get somethi
think broadly of markets like china and brazil. these are markets that started to increase monetary easing. that have started to restructure their economies and certainly we think china has avoided very nicely a hard landing and will be back for growth track next year. >> talk to me about getting yield. that what everybody want right now. how are you doing it? high yield or investment grade securities or where? >> we are underweighted and they don't provide much of a yield these days. they are on high yield and we've had a barn burner of the year with high yield. we still think you can get high digit returns in 2013. and we are looking at global infrastructure in real estate as providing a nice sustainable yield for investors. >> the big debate down here for the past couple of days after the fed made its announcement is whether or not that will prick the bond bubble. where whether we are in a bond bubble or whether there was a bond bubble. where do you stand on that? >> it's interesting. when i think after bubble, i think of something that can burst and drag values down to zero. one
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98 (some duplicates have been removed)